Easter Warning: Dogs and Chocolate

dogs and chocolate, dangers of dogs and chocolate, easter warning: dogs and chocolate

As Easter approaches, the veterinary surgeons here at Calder Vets are urging dog owners to keep their chocolate eggs out of sight.

Easter Warning: Dogs and Chocolate

As Easter approaches, the veterinary surgeons here at Calder Vets are urging dog owners to keep their chocolate eggs out of sight.

Dogs and chocolate

Chocolate contains theobromine which, although tolerated by humans, is extremely toxic to dogs. The darker the chocolate, the greater the amount of theobromine.

Toxic doses vary according to the size of your dog and cocoa solid content of the chocolate. As a rough guide it has been estimated that only 50g of plain chocolate could be enough to kill a small dog such as a Yorkshire Terrier, while just 400g could be enough to kill an average size dog.

Stuart Cooke, managing director of Calder Vets, said: “Never give chocolate to your dog or leave it in a place where your dog could help themselves to it.”

Symptoms of Chocolate Poisoning in Dogs

Symptoms of chocolate poisoning in dogs, which unfortunately can prove fatal, include:

  • Vomiting containing blood
  • Sore tummy
  • Diarrhea
  • Dehydration or excessive thirst
  • Hyperactivity and excitability
  • Drooling
  • High temperature and blood pressure
  • Abnormal heart rhythm and tremors
  • In severe cases, epileptic-type fits

If your dog is displaying any of these symptoms then take him to your local vet immediately.

Keeping your dog safe this Easter

Follow these tips to keep your dog safe from chocolate:

1)     Keep your chocolate hidden away out of sight and unavailable to your dog

2)     NEVER feed your dog chocolate intended for humans

3)     If your chocolate Easter egg is missing and you suspect the dog is the culprit, contact your local vet straight away

There is no antidote for theobromine poisoning with treatment being symptomatic. Therefore the sooner treatment is implemented, the greater the chance of recovery.

What to do if you suspect your dog has chocolate poisoning

If you suspect your dog has chocolate poisoning, contact your local vet immediately. If you are based in West Yorkshire, you can call the Calder Vets emergency helpline or contact your local branch.

Calder Vets prides itself on providing a personal, caring and professional service where the well-being of animals is the number one priority. It has some of the best veterinary facilities in the North of England and has 12 practices in West Yorkshire – Dewsbury, Mirfield, Wakefield, Sandal, Huddersfield, Brighouse, Horbury, Heckmondwike, Tingley, Penistone, Denby Dale and our new branch at Waterloo.